Rainbow Information Systems

Sep 18, 2014

thinksquad:

Government demands for information on Google’s users have risen 150% since the tech giant first started publishing their numbers, the company said on Monday. In the US the number of requests leapt 250%.

According to Google’s latest transparency report, in the first half of 2014, the number of government demands rose 15% compared to the second half of last year, and a 150% increase since Google first began publishing this data in 2009. In the US those increases are 19% and 250% respectively.

“This increase in government demands comes against a backdrop of revelations about government surveillance programs,” Google legal director Richard Salgado wrote in a blogpost. “Despite these revelations, we have seen some countries expand their surveillance authorities in an attempt to reach service providers outside their borders. Others are considering similar measures.”

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/sep/15/google-demands-user-data-rise

(Source: thinksquad, via fleshcoatedtechnology)

Sep 17, 2014

TV Stations in Los Angeles to Share a Channel to Free Up Spectrum

infoneer-pulse:

Two broadcast television stations in Los Angeles will become the first participants in a pilot test of the government’s plans to eventually free up and auction off more airwaves for use in wireless broadband, officials said on Tuesday.

The stations, KLCS, a public broadcaster, and KJLA, a small multilingual programmer, will participate in a channel-sharing experiment that is being devised with the trade association for wireless phone carriers. The wireless companies are eager to get broadcasters to give up airwaves so they can buy them and use them for high-speed wireless Internet connections.

The experiment is intended to show the extent to which broadcast channels can be squeezed together on the electromagnetic spectrum without degrading the quality of their signals. If the experiment goes as planned, no changes will be visible to consumers, who will continue to tune in to the same channels on their television sets.

» via The New York Times (Subscription may be required for some content)

Sep 16, 2014

thinksquad:

The Commission’s proposed rule for “fast lanes” on the Internet that would cost extra has generated millions of comments since July

Net neutrality advocates mounted a large video billboard outside Federal Communications Commission headquarters Monday, on the last day for public comment on the Commission’s proposed Internet regulations. The laws, if approved, would allows Internet service providers (ISPs) like AT&T, Verizon and Comcast to create “fast lanes” that users can pay extra to access, thus violating the principle of net neutrality.

The billboard will play user-submitted videos from net neutrality rallies from major U.S. cities, along with users’ webcam appeals on why they believe net neutrality is important, according to Fight for the Future, an Internet advocacy group that worked with domain registrar Namecheap to set up the display.

The FCC’s window for input on the proposed law opened on July 15 and has since generated millions of comments. The FCC has not yet set a date to vote on new rules, and does not face a deadline, according to Bloomberg.

Recent analyses have indicated that most Internet users support net neutrality. A report by the Sunlight Foundation analyzed the public comments collected by the FCC to show that less than 1% of comments clearly opposed net neutrality. Another survey found that two-thirds of Americans are opposed to Internet “fast lanes.”

Meanwhile, net neutrality activism has recently hit its stride with visible success: most recently, a phone campaign to Congress members, public relations campaigns by Internet businesses and politicians, and virtual demonstration by popular websites.

http://time.com/3379456/net-neutrality-fcc-window-closes/

(Source: thinksquad, via fleshcoatedtechnology)

Aug 16, 2014

ted:

This is what sound looks like

You’ve never seen sound visualizations like this before. Evan Grant creates beautiful illustrations of what we hear by capturing the vibrations from sound waves in mediums like sand or water. This process — called cymatics — makes sound look so wonderfully alien.  

Watch the full talk here »

(via scienceyoucanlove)

Aug 15, 2014

springwise:

App lets users in 2G zones make free voice calls
Mobile phones are great things, but if there’s no cell or data reception they become pretty useless. We’ve already seen Kan Khajura Tesan enable those in media blackspots to gain access to entertainment through their cell phone, and now nanu is an Android app designed to deliver clear voice calls when only 2G data is available. READ MORE…
http://www.springwise.com/app-lets-users-2g-zones-free-voice-calls/

springwise:

App lets users in 2G zones make free voice calls

Mobile phones are great things, but if there’s no cell or data reception they become pretty useless. We’ve already seen Kan Khajura Tesan enable those in media blackspots to gain access to entertainment through their cell phone, and now nanu is an Android app designed to deliver clear voice calls when only 2G data is available. READ MORE…

Aug 14, 2014

thisistheverge:

Watch a thousand robots execute the ultimate nerd choreography There’s something unsettling about watching 1,000 robots execute a perfectly choreographed routine. The entire demonstration makes it a bit too easy to forget that humans, researchers at Harvard University, provided the algorithms that allowed them to accomplish various formations. And yet, these machines — tiny $20 robots that take five minutes each to assemble, for a total of 83 hours — are actually completely banal. In fact, according to the researchers, their capabilities are pretty abysmal.
http://www.theverge.com/2014/8/14/5995211/watch-a-thousand-robots-execute-the-ultimate-nerd-choreography

thisistheverge:

Watch a thousand robots execute the ultimate nerd choreography
There’s something unsettling about watching 1,000 robots execute a perfectly choreographed routine. The entire demonstration makes it a bit too easy to forget that humans, researchers at Harvard University, provided the algorithms that allowed them to accomplish various formations. And yet, these machines — tiny $20 robots that take five minutes each to assemble, for a total of 83 hours — are actually completely banal. In fact, according to the researchers, their capabilities are pretty abysmal.

Jul 19, 2014

If A Network Is Broken, Break It More

txchnologist:

image

by Sophie Bushwick, Inside Science

From the World Wide Web to the electrical grid, networks are notoriously difficult to control. A disturbance to just one part of the system can spread quickly and affect the whole thing. But this problem is its own solution: by selectively damaging part of the network, we can bring the entire system to a better state.

Why is it so important to manipulate networks? These complex systems pervade our everyday lives, from telecommunications systems to the connected neurons that form memories in your brain.

Unfortunately, nudging just a few nodes of a network can cause the entire system to malfunction. Take the electrical grid: A few downed power lines can trigger widespread blackouts. And it takes a lot of work and expensive materials to fix the broken components.

Read More

Jul 17, 2014

scienceyoucanlove:

Telecommunications could one day be made more secure by a ‘time cloak’ that hides data sent through optical fibres, say researchers. The engineers from the US report that they’ve managed to ‘punch holes’ in time to conceal data as it is transmitted. “No one can pick it up, so you might as well say it didn’t happen. It is as good as erasing the past,” said leader researcher Joseph Lukens.Read more: http://bit.ly/11s40qi via ABC Science, image: aetb/iStock — mit Jay Escabarte Avila,Thania Angela Quibot und Zeke Synthesiser Porter.
source

scienceyoucanlove:

Telecommunications could one day be made more secure by a ‘time cloak’ that hides data sent through optical fibres, say researchers. The engineers from the US report that they’ve managed to ‘punch holes’ in time to conceal data as it is transmitted. “No one can pick it up, so you might as well say it didn’t happen. It is as good as erasing the past,” said leader researcher Joseph Lukens.

Read more: http://bit.ly/11s40qi via ABC Science, image: aetb/iStock
— mit Jay Escabarte Avila,Thania Angela Quibot und Zeke Synthesiser Porter.

source

Jun 19, 2014

 Rainbow Information Systems

 Rainbow Information Systems

Jun 18, 2014

Telecommunication consulting from Rainbow

Telecommunication consulting from Rainbow